Why Designers Should Care About Measuring Success

“How do you know this design is better?”
This question stumbles even the most seasoned designers. Businesses are recognizing the importance of design and the competitive advantage that taking a design-led approach offers. Designers are moving up the corporate ranks and we’re now beginning to see titles like “Design Strategist,” “Design Director” and “Chief Design Officer” take hold within organizations. As designers, the decisions that we are now making carry much more weight and inherently, more risk, to the companies we serve.
This presentation proposes 3 questions that designers can ask to tease out measurement of success early in our creative processes. It will explore methods to develop concrete measurements that will enable designers to make faster decisions, create better alignment with traditional business metrics (e.g. Online conversion rate, sales per square inch), and have more courage to push creative boundaries in our work.

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prototype vs. sim—validating software and ux design

Making is designing. Use technology to make ideas real as part of the design process (not only part of the build process). Watch the rise and fall of what people change/tinker with (DIY culture) to know where you are getting it right (things that are left alone) and where you are not there yet (things that are modded). Perceptual prototyping is maturing.

[ SXSW Bios ] #sxsw #frogsxswi (Archive)

Brief

How much smoke and mirrors does it take to validate interaction models during the software design process? When do you have to stop faking it and start making it? How do you handle the traps of realistic demos slipping into production or permanent beta? Simulation, spike, proof-of-concept, interactive demo, prototype, and other artifacts often come with loose definitions and inflated expectations or lose their primary purpose during collaborative software design and realization. Design technology experts from frog who regularly push and pull on the boundaries of art and science will define bounds and discuss challenges, opportunities, risks, and rewards of going too far in real code during design or not going far enough. Topics will include defining needs and socializing intent for code-driven design assets across stakeholders, balancing speed and fidelity during interaction design, and understanding where early target platform development best informs and validates design. Continue reading “prototype vs. sim—validating software and ux design”

the complexity curve: designing for simplicity

Beginning of a project, we understand it completely. Then we begin (and quickly realize that it is more complex than we initially thought, we add features, we hit constraints). We get to a “feature complete” state (top of bell curve): a product is maximally complex and feature complete but not really finished.

If you don’t design something, don’t be surprised if you have a crappy product.

[ SXSW Bios ] #sxsimplerux (Archive)

Brief

Interfaces and devices are providing more and more power and functionality to people, and in many cases this additional power is accompanied by increasing complexity. Although people have more experience and are more sophisticated, it still takes time to learn new interfaces, information, and interactions. Although we are able to learn and use these often difficult interfaces, we increasingly seek and appreciate simplicity. Continue reading “the complexity curve: designing for simplicity”

applying behavior design

Matching academic thinking on behavior and motivation with practical web projects. Where in my product/service do I effect behavior change? Where am I persuading users to change their behavior or motivating the user to use my product in a particular way? How do I balance customer/user value with business value (both implicitly and explicitly) and how transparent am I being about my techniques and constraints?

“We should look at what kind of impact people’s behavior should have on our designs.”

[ SXSW Bios ] #sxsw #behavior (Archive)

Brief

More and more products and services are designed around motivating users and incentivizing change. Products and services in finance, health and the environment, among other areas, are increasingly designed around influencing behavior. There are useful academic models and patterns for applying persuasion techniques. Now it’s time to understand how this is applied practically to our products and services. While understanding how powerful behavior design can influence people to be better, we will also discuss and illustrate how we design these products and services so that they serve the interest of customers, as well as meet business needs. As designers, the choices we make invariably influence users, and now we are harnessing what we know about designing around behavior to produce products and services that have a positive social impact on people’s lives. It’s time to move beyond just the concepts and theories and understand how to apply persuasive design responsibly. Continue reading “applying behavior design”

faster design decisions with style tiles

We need a better design artifact than the comp / mockup (because iterating against a mockup is too much work). How can you develop buy-in for design decisions early and carry that support to the end of a project? How can you maintain client trust throughout the process and end up with few-to-no changes at the end (when you have implemented an interface)?

[ SXSW Bios ] #sxsw #FastDesign (Archive)

Brief

With responsive design designers need to rethink the process they go through to work with clients and developers to create successful visual designs. Rather than creating traditional comps, style tiles are a deliverable that help you to communicate with your client, establish a visual language and work iteratively with developers. In this presentation, Samantha will explain how to reinvent your process to leverage Style Tiles as a deliverable. Continue reading “faster design decisions with style tiles”

designing for context

We have to design for multiple contexts (situation people are in while they are using a particular product/service): location, time, form and technology, relationship, and product ecosystems. Challenge for designers: solve problems for those contexts.

[ SXSW Bios ] #sxsw #designcon #dforc (Archive)

Brief

As designers take on new problems of convergence and ubiquity, we find ourselves facing new challenges. The products we create are accessed through multiple devices, different channels and a wide audience. How do we accommodate the context of use? Continue reading “designing for context”

anatomy of a design decision

[ SXSW Bios ]

@jmspool
@uie

Brief

What separates a good design from a bad design are the decisions that the designer made. Jared will explore the five styles of design decisions, showing you when gut instinct produces the right results and when designers need to look to more user-focused research. You’ll see how informed decisions play out against rule-based techniques, such as guidelines and templates. And Jared will show you the latest research showing how to hire great decision makers and find opportunities that match your style. Of course, Jared will use his unforgettable presentation style to deliver an extremely entertaining and informative presentation. Continue reading “anatomy of a design decision”